Difference between revisions of "Episode:Jesus Faces Death—Brought to Trial (Part 4)"

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==Notes by Brad==
 
==Notes by Brad==
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+
 
 +
* How was it the Romans in these times were a "civilization?"
 +
** They trace their lineage back to the Andites, the long-ago beginning of upstepped civilization.
 +
** Cultural nurture.
 +
** Augustus seems to have been positively affected by the spiritual quickening in and around Jesus' time.  He's not a run-of-the-mill ruler.
 +
** Perhaps the Greek philosophic objectivity and clarity they brought helped in this.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* Children (of God) shouldn't play with spirit (fire).
 +
** There is no such thing as good intentions.  Good is a spirit word.  Intentions are outer life.
 +
** There are good motives and bad motives, though.
 +
** But even a good motive does not ''innately'' lead to true intentions.  That takes wisdom, not ignorance.
 +
** Translating an ideal to an idea is just as fraught.  How big is your view of the big picture?
 +
** One approach: [[start small]], or [[start with yourself]].  Have some temperance (i.e., patience, self-neutrality)
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* It's important to not double down on a bad motive.  If you know better and persist anyway, things will decline precipitously.
 +
** Can you have enough self-awareness to catch yourself, [[pull back on the reins]], and seek to understand why you've lost clarity?
 +
*** Can you avoid the natural thing of pointing a finger at someone else?  Can you not listen to the lawyers and litigators?
 +
** [[Courageous and independent cosmic thinking]] is called for.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* Some clarifications on historic problems in the Bible narrative
 +
** Our authors have no problem with non-linear storytelling.  We shouldn't either, we've all seen movies that do this.
 +
** For 2000 years this story has been difficult to place in the timeline.
 +
** It takes a human to read the 5th ER, not a machine, though, because non-linearity needs you to be on your guard.
 +
** Read and if the big-picture of the text begins to seem absurd, then you should back up and find the error you made.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* Peter felt out of place in the courtyard.
 +
** That happens all the time with immature people in out-of-place settings.  Fear takes over.  Higher wits are lost.
 +
** And his mind is racing, trying to make sense of events.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* Peter is not a human right now.  Fear has made him barely a fancy animal.
 +
** And the "mischievous" girl in the courtyard can easily detect his neurosis here.
 +
*** Is "mischievous (mischief) akin to "mistake"?  Is this woman doing something wrong by needling Peter?  Setting aside conformity with the cosmos, to play around a little bit?
 +
*** She's not just playing, she's delighting in someone else's pain.  Which is disruptive to one's mind.
 +
*** And yet, in supremacy, she's playing the part quite well here.
 +
** He sure isn't thinking clearly!  He thought leaving would attract attention?  That doesn't even make sense.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* Concerning "pity and love" that Jesus gave Peter in a look
 +
** Pity is far lower in the [[levels of meaning]] than fatherly love.
 +
** '''HOMEWORK:''' See [28:6], the memories of mercy, for some context about pity.
 +
** And Peter subsequently was in agony.  He was a rare combination of "courage and cowardice," and one can imagine that can produce agony in the mind of a man.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* In some ways, Peter resembles Judas Iscariot.
 +
** Don't be so quick to sanctify Peter.  The ONLY thing in his mind was how clever he was.  How is that not at least as problematic as Judas's thoughts?
 +
** Judas self-praised himself.  So did Peter after all these denials.
 +
** Can you extend fatherly love to Judas?  an ignorant little child of God?  He and Peter were not so different in many ways.  Cowardice was in them both.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* Your material mind naturally follows the path of least resistance--just as physical laws do this.
 +
** To be righteous is to follow a path of ''most'' resistance. [[Be unnatural]].
 +
** reflect on this for your spiritual life, your political life, etc: '''"All too often one’s own mind tends to justify continuance in the path of error when once it is entered upon."'''
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* Did Jesus forgive Peter?  He didn't need to; he never took offense.
 +
** Provocative: can your love be so fatherly that it doesn't need to forgive? 
 +
** Fancy animals are all about forgiveness; true humans never take offense in the first place.
 +
** Sorry, Alexander Pope, but "to err is human, to forgive divine" might need to be reconsidered in this light.

Revision as of 04:03, 22 January 2020

January 21, 2020 [Paper 184:2, p. 1980]

Not until the cock crowed did it occur to Peter that he had denied his Master. Not until Jesus looked upon him, did he realize that he had failed to live up to his privileges as an ambassador of the kingdom. And he never fully believed that he could be forgiven until he met his Master after the resurrection and saw that he was received just as before the experiences of the tragic night of the denials.

Listen to the broadcast

Keywords: Urantia, Jesus, Peter's Fear, Peter's Denials, Peter's Agony



Notes by Brad

  • How was it the Romans in these times were a "civilization?"
    • They trace their lineage back to the Andites, the long-ago beginning of upstepped civilization.
    • Cultural nurture.
    • Augustus seems to have been positively affected by the spiritual quickening in and around Jesus' time. He's not a run-of-the-mill ruler.
    • Perhaps the Greek philosophic objectivity and clarity they brought helped in this.


  • Children (of God) shouldn't play with spirit (fire).
    • There is no such thing as good intentions. Good is a spirit word. Intentions are outer life.
    • There are good motives and bad motives, though.
    • But even a good motive does not innately lead to true intentions. That takes wisdom, not ignorance.
    • Translating an ideal to an idea is just as fraught. How big is your view of the big picture?
    • One approach: start small, or start with yourself. Have some temperance (i.e., patience, self-neutrality)


  • It's important to not double down on a bad motive. If you know better and persist anyway, things will decline precipitously.


  • Some clarifications on historic problems in the Bible narrative
    • Our authors have no problem with non-linear storytelling. We shouldn't either, we've all seen movies that do this.
    • For 2000 years this story has been difficult to place in the timeline.
    • It takes a human to read the 5th ER, not a machine, though, because non-linearity needs you to be on your guard.
    • Read and if the big-picture of the text begins to seem absurd, then you should back up and find the error you made.


  • Peter felt out of place in the courtyard.
    • That happens all the time with immature people in out-of-place settings. Fear takes over. Higher wits are lost.
    • And his mind is racing, trying to make sense of events.


  • Peter is not a human right now. Fear has made him barely a fancy animal.
    • And the "mischievous" girl in the courtyard can easily detect his neurosis here.
      • Is "mischievous (mischief) akin to "mistake"? Is this woman doing something wrong by needling Peter? Setting aside conformity with the cosmos, to play around a little bit?
      • She's not just playing, she's delighting in someone else's pain. Which is disruptive to one's mind.
      • And yet, in supremacy, she's playing the part quite well here.
    • He sure isn't thinking clearly! He thought leaving would attract attention? That doesn't even make sense.


  • Concerning "pity and love" that Jesus gave Peter in a look
    • Pity is far lower in the levels of meaning than fatherly love.
    • HOMEWORK: See [28:6], the memories of mercy, for some context about pity.
    • And Peter subsequently was in agony. He was a rare combination of "courage and cowardice," and one can imagine that can produce agony in the mind of a man.


  • In some ways, Peter resembles Judas Iscariot.
    • Don't be so quick to sanctify Peter. The ONLY thing in his mind was how clever he was. How is that not at least as problematic as Judas's thoughts?
    • Judas self-praised himself. So did Peter after all these denials.
    • Can you extend fatherly love to Judas? an ignorant little child of God? He and Peter were not so different in many ways. Cowardice was in them both.


  • Your material mind naturally follows the path of least resistance--just as physical laws do this.
    • To be righteous is to follow a path of most resistance. Be unnatural.
    • reflect on this for your spiritual life, your political life, etc: "All too often one’s own mind tends to justify continuance in the path of error when once it is entered upon."


  • Did Jesus forgive Peter? He didn't need to; he never took offense.
    • Provocative: can your love be so fatherly that it doesn't need to forgive?
    • Fancy animals are all about forgiveness; true humans never take offense in the first place.
    • Sorry, Alexander Pope, but "to err is human, to forgive divine" might need to be reconsidered in this light.